News

Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello Microbiome Research Featured in Rutgers Magazine Online

 

Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, microbial ecologist and member of the Anthropology Department Faculty, explores the preservation and rebuilding of the human microbiome, which has been severely compromised by overuse of antibiotics and other factors. Her research can have great impact on human health and the practice of medicine.

Link to Article

Erin Vogel received the 2019 Robert W. Sussman Award for scientific contributions to anthropology from the American Association for the Advancement of Science

Erin Vogel, Henry Rutgers Term Chair Professor of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences, received the 2019 Robert W. Sussman Award for scientific contributions to anthropology from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. See here in the current faculty and staff news letter.

Discover Magazine Article Covers Human Generosity Project

Discover Magazine covers research from the Human Generosity Project, a project created by Lee Cronk (SAS) and other researchers, that found generous societies are more likely to survive during difficult times, quoting Cathryn Townsend (SAS).

Link to article

Human Generosity Project Video

Catalyst, a TV production crew at Arizona State, has created a 25 minute video featuring The Human Generosity Project. This Project, co-directed by Lee Cronk of Rutgers University NB Anthropology Department and Athena Aktipis of Arizona State University, uses multiple methodologies to explore the nature of generosity in people and cultures around the globe. It is the first large-scale transdisciplinary research project to investigate the interrelationship between biological and cultural influences on human generosity.

Link to Human Generosity Project video

Link to Human Generosity Project web site

Festschrift in honor of Robin Fox has been published

See more here.

Erin Vogel, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, is co-director of the Tuanan Orangutan Research Station

Erin Vogel, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, is co-director of the Tuanan Orangutan Research Station. The Tuanan team is currently fighting fires at the station and surrounding forest that are a result of El Niño and small scale fires that have spread throughout the region of Central Kalimantan. Read more about the fires in Indonesia here. Professor Vogel's work on orangutan diet and conservation was recently highlighted in Scientific American.

Lee Cronk's research with The Human Genorosity Project was recently featured in High Country News

Lee Cronk's research with The Human Genorosity Project was recently featured in High Country News, a magazine for those living in the Rocky Mountain region. Dr. Cronk is mentioned as well as graduate student Dennis Sonkoi. Read the article, Why Being a Good Neighbor is a Good Idea.

PDF

Professor Erin Vogel was awarded the 2017 Rutgers Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research

Professor Erin Vogel was awarded the 2017 Rutgers Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Research and was also named as a Henry Rutgers Term Chair Professor (2017-2022).

Professor Erin Vogel received a 3-year research grant from the National Science Foundation (2017-2020) titled “Coping with a challenging environment: a holistic approach to
nutritional immunology in wild Bornean orangutans”. The goal of this project is to understand how nutritional strategy modulates immune function in response to natural variation in nutrient availability in one of our closest living relatives, orangutans.

Professor Erin Vogel received a 2-year research grant from the L.S.B. Leakey Foundation (2017-2019) focusing on nutritional immunology in wild Bornean orangutans.

Professor Robert Scott has been awarded a 3-year Senior Research Grant

Professor Robert Scott has been awarded a 3-year Senior Research Grant from the National Science Foundation titled "Collaborative Research: Experimental Assessment of Dental Micro-wear Formation”. His research team will conduct experiments designed to evaluate how patterns of microscopic damage in teeth that result from foods of varying mechanical properties should be interpreted to reconstruct diet in fossil humans.