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Dr. Parvis Ghassem-Fachandi does research in Gujarat, India

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Dr. Daniel Goldstein in Belgium

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Recently graduated anthropology major continues her work and studies

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Dr. Dorothy Hodgson and Maasai activist Ndini Kimesera Sikar at the U.N. in NYC

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Student discusses honors poster on “Undocumented Mexican Women in New Brunswick”

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Dr. David Hughes at Fukushima Workshop, Tokyo

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Graduate student meets orangutan as a T.A. in Borneo with Rutgers Study Abroad "Primates, Ecology and Conservation in Indonesia"

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Student discusses Honors work at historic site in Trappe, PA with Chair, Dr. Craig Feibel

Why Study Anthropology

What makes us human? How do we relate to one another – with what shared values or drives? When we disagree, how do we express the differences we consider unbridgeable? Are they, in fact, unbridgeable? These are anthropological questions. They touch on the evolution of Homo sapiens, on the culture of various human groups, or on both of these elements together. If these topics intrigue you – and how could they not? - then you should consider majoring or minoring in anthropology.

Students of anthropology go to great lengths to explore difference and similarity.  Some of us – evolutionary anthropologists - study orangutans, observing behavior and collecting urine to assess their social structure.  A cultural anthropologist might live among sorghum farmers or slum dwellers in Africa, learning their language and eventually seeing their world through their eyes.  Some archaeologists jump back a million years to probe the survival strategies, successes, and failures of the earliest humans. Finally, linguistic anthropologists often scrutinize conversation to see who – male, female, elder, or child - speaks first, loudest, and in which language?  All of anthropology will challenge your assumptions, occasionally blow your mind, and ultimately prepare you for the diverse world in which we live. 

 

Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University

Programs of study
B.A. in Anthropology (combines all fields) - 40 credits
Introductory courses – 16 credits
Upper-level courses – 9 credits
Electives – 15 credits
B.A. in Cultural Anthropology (includes linguistic anthropology) – 38 credits
Introductory courses – 8 credits
Geographic area courses – 6 credits
Global perspectives on justice, inequality and difference – 3 credits
Electives – 21 credits
B.S. in Evolutionary Anthropology (includes archaeology) – 50 credits
Introductory courses – 11 credits
Statistics – 3 credits
Sub-discipline courses – 18 credits
Biology or geology and electives – 18 credits
Minor in Anthropology (combines all fields) – 20 credits
Introductory courses – 8 credits
Electives – 12 credits
Minor in Cultural Anthropology (includes linguistic anthropology) – 20 credits
Introductory courses – 8 credits
Geographic area course – 3 credits
Electives – 9 courses
Minor in Evolutionary Anthropology (includes archaeology) – 20 credits
Introductory courses – 11 credits
Electives – 9 credits
Certificate in Evolutionary Medicine – 12 credits
Genetics course - 3credits
Evolutionary approaches to diet or evolutionary physiology – 3 credits
Genetic variation and evolution in humans or infectious microbes - 3 credits
Advanced evolution or evolutionary medicine elective – 3 credits

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Ruth Adams Building, 3rd Floor
131 George Street
New Brunswick, New Jersey  08901-1414


P  848-932-4193
F  732-932-1564
maydelle@rci.rutgers.edu  undergraduate harden@anthropology.rutgers.edu  graduate
joreaves@anthropology.rutgers.edu  nonacademic