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Dr. Parvis Ghassem-Fachandi does research in Gujarat, India

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Dr. Daniel Goldstein in Belgium

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Recently graduated anthropology major continues her work and studies

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Dr. Dorothy Hodgson and Maasai activist Ndini Kimesera Sikar at the U.N. in NYC

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Student discusses honors poster on “Undocumented Mexican Women in New Brunswick”

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Dr. David Hughes at Fukushima Workshop, Tokyo

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Graduate student meets orangutan as a T.A. in Borneo with Rutgers Study Abroad "Primates, Ecology and Conservation in Indonesia"

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Student discusses Honors work at historic site in Trappe, PA with Chair, Dr. Craig Feibel

Yarimar Bonilla

Yari BW cropped

(PhD, U Chicago, 2008; Associate Professor, SAS) Political and Historical Anthropology, Postcolonial Studies, Social Movements, Sovereignty, Race, State, Nation, Caribbean Studies,  American Studies.  yarimar.bonilla@rutgers.edu https://twitter.com/yarimarbonilla

For Press Inquiries/Interview Requests please write to: YarimarPress@gmail.com

 

 

BONILLA BOOK COVER

Blurring the lines between political and historical anthropology, Professor Bonilla  teaches and writes about questions of sovereignty, citizenship, and race across the Americas. She has tracked these issues across a broad range of sites and practices including: anti-colonial labor activism in the French Caribbean, the role of digital protest in the Black Lives Matter movement, the politics of the Trump presidency, and her current research on the political impact of environmental disasters.

Bonilla’s first book,Non-Sovereign Futures: French Caribbean Politics in the Wake of Disenchantment, examines how contemporary activists in the French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe imagine and contest the limits of postcolonial sovereignty. Challenging contemporary notions of freedom, sovereignty, nationalism, and revolution, Non-Sovereign Futures recasts Guadeloupe, and the Caribbean as a whole, not as a problematically non-sovereign site, but as a place that can unsettle how we think of sovereignty itself.

Professor Bonilla’s second book project Shattered Futures asks how Puerto Ricans envision their political futures in the context of the territory’s fiscal, political, social, and environmental crisis. She is also at work on an ethnographic study of the Puerto Rican pro-statehood movement, tentatively titled The Unthinkable State, which traces how and why annexationism has come to be imagined as a form of anti-colonial politics.

In addition, Professor Bonilla has a strong interest in the role of digital technologies within social movements and academic practice. She has theorized hashtag usage within the context of the Black Lives Matter movement and the semiotics of digital protest in the context of Guadeloupe. She is currently developing a multi-media political atlas of the Caribbean entitled, Visualizing Sovereignty and is a principal collaborator in the #PuertoRicoSyllabus project.

Bonilla has been the recipient of multiple grants and awards from the National Science Foundation, the Wenner Gren Foundation, the Chateaubriand Fellowship Program, the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Carter G. Woodson Institute for Afro-American and African Studies at the University of Virginia, and the W.E.B. Dubois Institute at Harvard University. She is currently Section Editor of Public Anthropologies for the journal American Anthropologist, and serves on the editorial committee for Small Axe: A Caribbean Platform for Criticism.

 Please visit Professor Bonilla's Personal Website for more information and links to recent articles and interviews.

 

 

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